The humble tray: your secret to keeping every room organised

Want an easy and stylish way to control your clutter? Find out how a simple tray can get your room organisation in check – all around the home.

Updated

living room with gray sofa, pillows and decorative objects

Using a tray is something we don’t really think about beyond the essentials. As standard, you’ll probably use one to organise your cutlery drawer or have one ready to rest a lazy TV dinner on. But the humble tray can be key to keeping each room in your home organised – and can look stylish while you’re at it. (Yes, really!)

Want to be convinced? Try out these room organisation ideas:

Kitchen organising tips: get rustic with your fruit and herbs

The kitchen needn’t be devoid of your unique style. Swap that tired fruit bowl and old-fashioned spice rack with a one-for-all tray on your kitchen table. For example, you could add some rustic charm to your farmhouse-style kitchen by dotting fresh fruit amid a few pots of freshly-grown herbs on a tiered tray (which you could even make yourself using cake tins).

Bathroom organisation: feel like you’re on holiday

Give your bathroom that luxury hotel room feel by organising daily essentials such as cotton wool, rolled-up fluffy flannels and beauty products on a stackable tray. It takes zero effort, looks chic and could make your daily cleansing routine that little bit more relaxing when you’ve got all the essentials in one eye-pleasing place.

Working from home organisation: office tech on the go

Flexible working is getting more and more popular, so leaving spare laptop chargers and conference call headphones lying around the home can be an easy trap to fall into. But with today’s technology smaller than ever, you could easily fit your home office tech, alongside traditional stationery, on a well-organised flat tray. Choose one with handles so you can literally move your ‘office’ around the house and be ready to take important calls in your quiet study or check emails eating lunch in the kitchen. Keeping everything together in one tray also makes putting your work worries away at the end of the day much easier. And if you have a dedicated home office, don’t miss these great ideas and strategies for keeping your desk tidy and clean.

Bedroom organisation: a beauty bar in your own home

Getting ready for a night out can sometimes leave your bedroom looking like someone scattered the contents of Superdrug over your bed, dressing table and once-pristine carpet. Whether you’re trying to find that long-forgotten nail polish that goes perfectly with tonight’s outfit, or want to test out a few different eyeshadows, the search through make-up bags and drawers can be panic-inducing when you’re limited for time.

That’s where our tray comes to the rescue and delivers a simple lesson in how to keep a room tidy. Why not hang your jewellery in wall-mounted trays, and your other beauty bits in a cake stand-style stackable? You could use a repurposed drawer divider for your necklaces, and get a rotating organiser for your polishes and perfumes. That way you can choose your weapons more easily, with the added benefit of your bedroom feeling wonderfully in order. (If you’re looking to clear some clutter in your bedroom while you’re at it, check out our guide to prepping clothes for storage.)

Living room organisation: minibars, magazines and remotes

When you have guests over to stay, it’s nice to end the evening with a little nightcap. Whether they opt for a ruby port or a wee dram, you can serve these stylishly with a readily stocked minibar. Choose a classic metallic tray, lay out your beverages of choice with a few cut-glass tumblers and you’re ready for that winding-down part of the evening with minimal effort.

And for those lazy afternoons, make sure you have all your entertainment in reach by organising your coffee table. A few magazines and TV remote controls can be nestled together using a simple flat tray to go with the theme of your living room. You could even add a small plant to add a touch of nature to your chill-out time.

Originally published