How to remove yellow armpit stains on shirts and clothes

No sweat, no fuss: smarten up sweat stained shirts easily with this essential guide to removing yellow stains!

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how to remove yellow armpit stains on shirts and clothes

The Dos and Don’ts for how to prevent a build up of yellow armpit stains:

  1. Do allow your deodorant to dry properly before getting dressed.
  2. Do not put on excess amounts of deodorant.
  3. Do not repeatedly wear clothes that have sweat stains on them. Tackle a yellow stain as soon as you notice it.
  4. Don’t leave sweaty clothes to linger in a pile on the floor! Wash them as soon as possible to prevent sweat from drying and forming crusty, yellow stains.

The unsightly yellow armpit stains that build up on white shirts and other pale clothes can be pretty disheartening. But with the right techniques and products, they are easy to remove – so shirts consigned to the ‘only under a jacket’ category can once again be worn with pride. This article explains how to remove yellow armpit stains and get your clothes looking as fresh and smart as ever.

A specially designed commercial cleaner will usually give you great results without damaging your garment (although make sure that you always read the product instructions and garment label first). If you do opt for a homemade product, test it on a small, unnoticeable area of your garment first.

How to Remove Armpit Stains

First, take a look at your laundry detergent. Yellow stains on white clothes come from the combination of proteins in sweat with the chemicals in deodorant. Modern biological laundry detergents are formulated to dissolve protein-based stains – a product like Persil Bio detergent may do the job in isolation. If you are wondering how to get yellow stains out of white shirts cheaply, either try rubbing a little neat liquid laundry detergent directly onto the affected area to do so, wearing protective gloves if necessary. Leave it on for 30 minutes, and then wash as normal.

Remember: Always check the care label on your garment before attempting stain removal and follow any guidelines on your laundry detergent’s label carefully.

This video will show you how to make your clothes look fresh and clean again, especially if you also have a big sunscreen stain on your t-shirt after a warm, sunny day:

How to Remove Armpit Stains with Oxygen Bleach

If the method above doesn’t work, you may want to try using oxygen bleach as a pre-wash treatment. Be aware, however, that while oxygen bleach is ideal for organic stains, it is not safe to use on coloured or delicate fabrics like silk or wool. As with any cleaning product, always follow the instructions on the packet, and remember to wear gloves and protective clothing. Test the bleach on a small and inconspicuous area first to be certain your fabric is robust enough.

  1. Mix up a pre-wash solution of 1-2 tablespoons of oxygen bleach powder in a gallon of water. For old or stubborn stains, an additional 2 tablespoons of powder may be added.
  2. Leave stained items to soak for up to an hour. Stubborn stains may be left to soak overnight in more dilute solutions.
  3. Wash garments as normal.

This should remove armpit stains with a minimum of fuss and bother. 

How to Remove Yellow Armpit Stains with Baking Soda Paste

If your garment has not responded to a quality laundry detergent, and cannot be treated with bleach, the following method covers how to remove yellow stains with a simple home remedy. Be aware that baking soda can be very abrasive, and you will still need to wear gloves – once again, you should test this method on a small, unnoticeable area first to be certain it is safe for your clothing.

  1. Mix baking powder with water until you have a thick paste.
  2. Apply the paste to the stain using a toothbrush or your gloved fingers, and leave for 20 minutes.
  3. Wash the garment on a cold cycle with a quality laundry detergent.

Your white shirts will be back to their original brightness in no time. This stain removal guide will give you more hints and tips about removing other kinds of stains.

Originally published