Dog-friendly plants and flowers to plant in your garden

If you want to create a canine paradise for your favourite pet, read our handy guide to creating a dog-friendly garden and follow the steps below.

Updated

dog in garden with dog friendly plants

Flowers and plants can brighten up any home, but will your dog agree? Certain plants can be harmful to curious dogs who are keen to explore everything they find in the garden. Whether you're decorating your home or garden, or picking out a present for a dog-owning friend, it’s helpful to know which plants to avoid and which ones are safe. Here we’ve got some helpful tips on plants toxic to dogs and flowers safe for dogs as well as some easy tips to follow to create a dog-friendly outside space.

If your dog ingests any type of plant and seems unwell, seek advice from a registered vet as soon as you can.

Plants poisonous to dogs

This isn’t an exhaustive list – there are actually loads of plants that dogs shouldn’t eat – but here are a few of the more common plants that should not be consumed by your dog. If you see them eating any plant and you’re not sure whether they should, consult your vet ASAP:

  • Aloe vera
  • Amaryllis bulbs
  • Asparagus ferns
  • Buttercup
  • Boxwood
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Clematis
  • Daffodil bulbs
  • Elderberry
  • English Ivy
  • Hyacinth bulbs
  • Ivy
  • Kale
  • Lilly
  • Narcissus bulbs
  • Potatoes
  • Snowdrops
  • St John’s Wort
  • Yarrow

Dog-friendly plants

OK, so now you know some plants to avoid. What are some non-toxic plants for dogs that are safe to put in your garden? Here are a few you can try:

  • Snapdragons
  • Michaelmas daisies
  • Camellias
  • Honeysuckle
  • Lavender
  • Rose
  • Sunflowers
  • Calendula

How to make a dog-friendly garden

Here are a few ways to make your garden more dog-friendly:

  1. Choose robust plants that aren’t going to get trampled on easily, for example nepeta and astilbe.
  2. Line the border of your flower beds with big bushy plants that dogs can’t get through easily, like shrub roses or lavender.
  3. Distract dogs from more delicate plants with a dedicated play area. Fill it with sand or bark for them to enjoy.
  4. If you want to grow flowers or vegetables that you don’t want the dog to go near, consider doing so in raised beds.
  5. Train dogs not to pee on the lawn as this can cause discolouration.
  6. Make sure to have a secure fence all the way around your garden.
  7. Lock away harmful chemicals and don’t use them in water features that your dog might drink from.

Remember, there are lots of different plants poisonous to dogs, so if you’re not sure, don’t let them eat it and if you find they have, get help urgently. By creating a dog-friendly outdoor space, you’re likely to reduce any risks and ensure you have a very happy canine friend.

Key steps

To make your home and garden is dog-friendly, follow these key steps:

  1. Look through our list of plants toxic to dogs and avoid these.
  2. If you want to check whether a particular plant is suitable before planting it, speak to your local nursery or vet.
  3. Be sure to lock up any dangerous chemicals including bleach and pesticides so your dog doesn’t accidently consume them.

Originally published