Tidy house, tidy mind: The mindfulness of cleaning

Clearing clutter can make you feel calmer. Scroll down to see read our tidying top tips to declutter your mind.

Updated

Person cleaning kitch worktop

Cleaning your home goes further than just dusting, laundry and stain removal. A clean and tidy home can help you relax and think more clearly - tidy house, tidy mind.

Even the process of cleaning can give you time to mull over challenges you’re facing and provide a therapeutic release of tension. So, why not give it a go? In this guide, we offer tips on how to declutter your mind (and life) by getting your home in order. It’s win-win.

Don't do everything at once, this could cause you to become unnecessarilys stressed. Instead, break up your day or week into managable cleaning chunks .

How to declutter your life in three easy steps

1. Sort out your wardrobe

Sometimes sorting out a particular area of your house or life can bring a bit of mental calm. You feel more in control and it gives you the confidence to tackle other areas.

Start by taking everything out and giving your closet a good scrubbing. It’s surprising how much dirt and dust can build up in the corners. Then, only put back in those things you wear often. If you’re not sure what items these are, try turning all your hangers to face one way. Then, each time you wear something, hang it back up with the hanger facing the other way.

Anything still facing the original direction after 6 months can be donated to charity or sold. Not only will this clear your home, but it will also help you to benefit others. You may even find getting rid of old clothes helps to break some of the emotional ties you have to specific items – clean home, clean mind.

Read our article on how to donate clothes to charity for more tips on clearing out your clothes.

2. Manage your garden: How to tidy up weeds

While everyone loves a tidy house there’s something particularly satisfying about decluttering your garden. The best way to start is by eradicating weeds: don thick gloves and pull out any plants that are growing where they shouldn’t.

It’s extremely satisfying to see the finished project of a neat and well-kept garden but gardening also gets you out in the fresh air and amongst nature which can help you feel calmer and more relaxed.

Once you’ve tackled the weeds, set yourself on bigger challenges. Our articles on how to clean garden furniture and how to clean greenhouses can help with the basics but we also have tips on reducing food waste by making your own compost. What better way to give back to nature?

3. Declutter your mind with a relaxing home

If you’ve sorted out a clean house, a clean mind is the next step. This might sound a bit more complicated but there are lots of ways to have a bit of a mental clean out.

First, consider how you can make your home more relaxing. Can you create a quiet area where you can rest after a long day? Would adding a few softly lit, battery-operated candles to bath time help you achieve a spa-like serenity? You may be surprised at what a difference this can make.

If you feel you still need more then why not try mindfulness: a form of guided meditation. There are plenty of specialist apps that can guide you through the exercises involved in this practice, many of which focus on common themes to help you address specific needs.

Can cleaning be therapeutic?

There’s a lot of truth to the old adage: clean room, clean mind. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, try and regain some order by sorting out an area of your house. It’s satisfying to see your success and can remind you that everything in life is manageable if you take it one step at a time.

Key steps

Want to know how to declutter your life? Here are a few quick steps

  1. Give the house a quick sweep with a bin liner and throw out obvious rubbish or clutter.
  2. Tackle the whole home in stages. Aim to fully declutter and clean one room each day or week, depending on your schedule and remembering to leave time for rest.
  3. Try mindfulness apps and meditation to help you bring other relaxing influences into your home.

Originally published